Black Drum Fishing Tips

The Black Drum is a large inshore fish that can often exceed 70 pounds. They have recently been reported as far north as the Sandy Hook but Delaware Bay is where they are most commonly found in large numbers. Some black drum are caught in the surf each year, but most are caught by boat. There are many charter boats in the Cape May area that specialize in catching black drum. The best months are May and June. Equipment needed to catch them can be purchased at almost any bait and tackle shop.

Bait and Tackle Shop Tips – Catching Black Drum

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Catching Them:
It’s best to fish from an anchored boat. Use a fish finder rig with just enough weight to hold bottom. The most effective baits are whole fresh clams or shedder crabs if you can find them at the bait and tackle shop. It is recommended to use a 3 foot 50-80 pound leader with an 8/0 – 12/0 hook. Cast your line out and let it settle to the bottom. Reel in slack until you come tight to the sinker. Set the pole in a holder in free spool with the line out alarm on. If a fish picks it up give, them a little slack. If you’re fishing a J hook click your reel into gear and set the hook sharply with a upward rod motion. If you are fishing a circle hook simply click the reel in gear and let the fish hook itself. These fish travel in tight schools so if you catch one there are sure to be many more so stay alert. The best place to find them is of the coast of the Cape May area. 
Basic Black Drum Fishing Tips:
  • Use fresh clams rather then frozen if you can get them at the local bait and tackle shop.
  • Shedder crabs work well too, and be purchased at almost any bait and tackle shop
  • You need a fairly heavy set up; 20–50 pound class rod and reels are best.
  • Fish travel in schools and move around a lot. When you get your shot you have to take full advantage so have some pre tied rigs made up so you can get back in the water quickly.

For more helpful Jersey Shore fishing tips as well as awesome saltwater fishing gear, bait, and other fishing equipment, check out Fin-atics. Serving the Cape May County area, this fishing tackle store offers quality supplies both in their Ocean City NJ store and online at good prices. Contact them at (609) 398-2248 or visit the website.

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Saltwater Fishing Tackle & Tips for Blackfish

Cape May County Saltwater Fishing Tackle | Ocean City Fishing SuppliesBlackfish are a popular fish to try and catch in the Jersey Shore area. are usually caught in the early spring and late fall. Green crabs and Filddler crabs from an anchored boat works well. Any rock pile in the bay or ocean will hold fish at one time or another. Locating and catching these fish requires a good bit of knowledge and skill and the proper saltwater fishing tackle. It’s not an easy task. Fishing the ocean is some what tricky since the fishing is done by locating wrecks and rock piles and proper saltwater fishing tackle is recommended. It’s best to fish from a charter or party boat that knows the wrecks and how to fish them. Blackfish are notorious bait stealers. You have to be fast. Some sharpies say you have to set the hook before the fish bite. It’s a great way to cure your fishing itch over the long winter. The Easter holiday usually kicks off the season so make sure you’ve stocked up on your saltwater fishing tackle. Here is some helpful information on catching blackfish.

Blackfish & Saltwater Fishing Tackle Tips

  • Time of Year to Catch: Blackfish usually like cold water so late fall/early winter and the beginning of spring are the best times.
  • How To Catch Them & Saltwater Tackle & Bait to Use: 
  1. Green crabs or fiddler crabs are the best baits fished from a anchored boat. As for your saltwater fishing tackle, a 3 way swivel with a sinker and a 6 to 8 inch leader works well.
  2. You have to be right on the wreck or in the rocks or you won’t catch.
  3. Best fished from a boat or from a rocky shore line.
  • Best Places To Catch Them:
  1. Any natural or artificial reef is a good spot.
  2. Any rock pile in the ocean or bay is likely to hold fish at one time of the year or another.
  • Tips to Conserve Saltwater Fishing Tackle:
  1. Make sure to bring plenty of rigs. You’ll need them since you’ll be fishing in areas full of snags.
  2. Use a pole with a strong tip so you can get a good fast hook set.
  3. Some people like to tie the sinker on with lighter weight mono then the line your fishing with. If the sinker gets snagged it can break free and allow you to save the rest of the rig.

For more helpful Jersey Shore fishing tips as well as awesome saltwater fishing tackle, bait, and other fishing equipment, check out Fin-atics. Serving the Cape May County area, this fishing tackle store offers quality supplies both in their Ocean City NJ store and online at good prices. Contact them at (609) 398-2248 or visit the website.

Cape May County Saltwater Fishing Tackle Homepage

Jersey Shore Fishing Tournament Entry Deadline July 20

Ocean City Fishing Supplies Boaters planning to fish the 21st JCAA Fluke Tournament on Aug. 2 must registered by 7/20 to be eligible for the $25,000 Big Fluke  prize for entering a doormat over 12 pounds. You can register online at www.JCAA.org,  or by calling the office at 732-506-6565. JCAA president Paul Haertel reports they have about 160 entrants so far,and many are joining the Calcuttas — ensuring there will be some nice payouts.

This event is actually nine mini-tournaments in one. Each weigh station or port has its own set of prizes for the heaviest fluke brought to the scales including $1,200 in cash for 1st place: The Barnegat Bay port is donated by South Harbor Marine; the Manasquan port by Hoffman’s Marina; the LBI port by Fisherman’s Headquarters; and the Cape May port by RJ Marine Service. The other ports are donated by the JCAA.
Major sponsors this year are G3 Boats, Salem Boat Exchange, Spring Garden Marine, Mercer Marine Supply and Mayberry Sales and Service, Yamaha Outboards, Costa Sunglasses, Interlux Paint, Underwater Green Fishing Lights, Tica Fishing Tackle and Canyon Reels.

There’s a total of 90 port prizes. Contestants register in one of 9 ports from Jersey City to Cape May, each with easy access weigh stations. You compete only against those boats registered in that port for the generous list of port prizes.

This year there will be Optional Cash Categories (Calcuttas) of $50.00 & $100.00 for each port and $50.00 & $100.00 Calcuttas for the overall tournament!, with 7/8ths of the money going to the winners and 1/8th to JCAA. Also new this year is a $25,000 Big Fluke Prize for anyone catching and weighing in a fluke exceeding 12 pounds by at least 1/100oz. However, your entry must be in by July 20.

Fin-atics 3rd Annual Fluke Derby June Winners

Congratulations to our June winners for Fin-atics 3rd Annual Fluke Derby.  Ken Ruckle of Egg Harbor Township, NJ took 1st Place with a 25-1/2″ 5.34lb Flatty on June 10th out of his kayak!  Second place was Brian Schuler from Seaville, NJ with a 24″ 4.95lb flounder, while Third place was taken by Mike Gardner of Petersburg, NJ with a 24-1/2″ 4.64lb fish.  June was a tough month locally for flounder fishing due to all the rain and wind, so an extra congrats to our winners is in order.  Weather so far in July has been better and water temps are on the rise so I would expect a few bigger fish this month.  Good luck to all our entrants and remember it is never to late to enter and it is always FREE with a chance to win up to $1500 in Fin-atics Gift Cards.  If you would like to enter, stop by the store, call us at (609)398-2248 or email your name, address, phone number and date of birth (only if you are under 14 years old so we may qualify you as a junior angler).  Good luck to everyone for the month of July and August.

Fishing Tackle Store Tips – Catching Striped Bass

Are you excited to catch some striped bass this season? This fishing tackle store sure is! Striped bass are on a come back in the Jersey Shore due to conservation from a few decades ago. They are perhaps the most sought after fish in the Jersey Shore area because of their size, close proximity to shore and their long strong drag wrenching strikes. They can be caught along the beaches, bays, and tidal rivers and rarely go more than a few miles from shore. Let’s talk about when they are around and how to get ’em!

Info On Striped Bass – Fishing Tackle Store

Fishing Tackle Store In Ocean City NJ | Jersey Shore Bait and Tackle

Time of Year to Catch:
Striped bass usually arrive in mid to late April and will sometimes hang around until early winter. smaller stripers are usually more plentiful in the spring and the larger ones are usually caught in the fall.
How To Catch Them:
  • This fishing tackle store and any avid angler would recommend drifting live eels or sandworms usually accounts for the most fish.
  • Sandworms in the spring and eels in the fall is a good strategy to go by.
  • Both baits can be worked by tying a rig using a 3-way swivel. Tie the 3-way to the line coming off your pole. On the remaining 2 swivel loops tie a 12-18 inch dropper for your sinker, and a 5-6 foot leader for your hook. A 25 lb. leader is a good happy medium since Stripers don’t have teeth and you want to keep line visibility down to a minimum. Use the lightest sinker that will allow you to hold bottom. Let your sinker hit the bottom and continue to bounce as you drift. Keep your conventional reel in free spool with the clicker on. When a fish hits the clicker will sound. Let the fish run for a few seconds, engage the reel and set the hook with a sharp strong motion. When fishing with an eel it’s a good idea to let the Bass run a little longer to make sure the eels entire length is taken.
  • Chunking from an anchored boat is also an effective method to fish for striped bass. Toss out Bunker chunks to attract fish while dropping back pieces of cut bunker on your hook.
  • Trolling tubes, jigs, bunker spoons, plugs or umbrella rigs work well also. This method is highly effective for locating fish. Some sharpies will troll to locate the fish and then anchor or drift in the area with bait. In order to keep your trolling lures down at the right depth it is usually necessary to troll with heavy drail sinkers or wire line. Wire line trolling is most effective. Some sharpies also use down riggers. Make sure you use at least a 6 ft mono leader when trolling for striped bass because they tend to be line shy. Stripers like a very slow troll, so maintain a very slow speed. If you can’t slow your boat down enough either drag a sea anchor or a 5 gallon bucket.

Any supplies in the info above can be easily purchased at any fishing tackle store.

Best Places To Catch Them:
Jersey Shore party boats charter boats will fish for Striped Bass. Some fish exclusively in the evening. From north to south the most popular party and charter boat areas for Stripers are Leonardo, Atlantic Highlands, Shark River & Belmar, Brielle & Point Pleasant, Barnegat Light and Cape May. If you have your own boat and a good fishing tackle store to go to, here are some popular areas

  • Sandy Hook Area – Sandy Hook Rip and channel, Flynns Knoll, Roamer Shoal, Schrewsbury Rocks.
  • Point Pleasant – Manasquan Inlet jetty and rock jetties along the shore
  • Barnegat Light – Along rock jetties on LBI and Island Beach State Park. Barnegat Inlet jetties
  • Cape May – Cape May rips

Extra Fishing Tackle Store Tips for Striped Bass

  • When chunking be sure not to be too generous or skimpy with the chunks. It’s a good idea to release 4 or 5 chunks every 2-3 minutes to keep a consistent slick to attract and hold fish. Too many chunks and the fish will hang back for the easy meal and not bother to move up into the slick near your hook. Too little chum and your not going to hold or attract fish. Use fresh rather then frozen bunker if you can get it. One bunker is cut into about 4 to 5 chunks. Don’t waste the head it’s good bait since its bony and will stay on the hook longer.
  • When trolling, speed is critical for Bass. Between 2.0 and 2.5 knots is a good speed. When trolling bunker spoons slow it down until you see your pole pulsing in an erratic side to side and bobbing motion.
  • When party boat fishing you usually drift so try and stay in the bow or stern so you can stay on the side where the lines are drifting.
  • When fishing from shore with bait it’s best to use a float rig. It keeps the bait off the bottom and away from crabs. You can purchase one from almost any fishing tackle store. Cut bunker and clams are best after a storm and live eels are optimal at night.
  • If you’re surf casting with lures you need only cast beyond the breaking waves. Striped bass love the suds because of the structure and water motion. If you plan to fish on jetties use jetty spikes since jetties are usually very slippery and can lead to injury or death if you lose your balance.
  • Always look for rips and tears in the water because striped bass are attracted to structure and water motion.

For more helpful Jersey Shore fishing tips as well as awesome fishing bait, tackle, and other fishing equipment, check out Fin-atics. Serving the Cape May County area, this fishing tackle store offers quality supplies both in their Ocean City NJ store and online at good prices. Contact them at (609) 398-2248 or visit the website.

Jersey Shore Fishing Tackle Store Homepage

Weakfish Fishing Tips

Weakfish or Seatrout are one of the best tasting and most colorful fish in the area. They typically like to reside in bays and rivers instead of open ocean. They can usually be found along or in deep channels and are often found in schools of great numbers. Since they are usually in tight schools you will need to locate them, which isn’t always easy. Luckily, once you have located a school, it’s not uncommon to catch 20 or more weakfish. They will typically weigh just a few pounds but can get as large as 8-10 lbs. Here are some tips on catching weakfish:

Catching Weakfish

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                                                                        Time of Year to Catch:
Weakfish will usually get in the area around June or July and will stay until mid September. They are usually one of the first fish to leave the area when the water begins to drop in temperature.
                                                                         How To Catch Them:
  • Drifting sandworms from a drifting boat is perhaps the most popular and effective ways to catch weakfish. A three way swivel with a sinker and a 3 to 4 ft leader works well.
  • Chumming from an anchored boat with Grass Shrimp is also an effective method.
  • Jigging with lead headed jigs works as well. Tip your jig off with a sandworm, grass shrimp, or Fins.
                                                             Best Places To Catch Them in NJ:
  • Raritan and Sandy Hook bays have had a good amount of these species in recent years. Areas like the Raritan Reach Channel, Princess Bay and the edges of Flynns Knoll are popular.
  • Barnegat bay is also a poplar area but only in specific areas.

Weakfish Fishing Tips:

  • They bite the most at dusk and into the evening
  • Put a fire tail rubber worm as well as a sandworm on your hook.
  • Avoid heavy traffic areas because they are easily spooked.
  • Once you have located the fish keep drifts in a concentrated area. These fish are usually in a dense school rather then a spread out over a large area.
  • The best way to locate fish is to look for a concentration of birds. If you have a fish finder you will usually mark what looks like clouds of bait fish.
  • When you chum with grass shrimp, don’t be too generous or skimpy with the shrimp. Release 5-10 shrimp at 2 to 3 minute intervals to keep a consistent slick and hold fish. Too much shrimp in the water and the fish will hang back for the easy meal and not bother to move up into the slick for your baits. Too little and your not going to hold or attract fish.
  • A slight change in wind direction or tide can turn these fish on or off.
  • When fishing from the shore with bait it’s best to use a float rig. It keeps the bait off the bottom and away from crabs.

For additional helpful New Jersey Shore fishing tips as well as top quality fishing bait, tackle, and other fishing supplies, check out Fin-atics. Serving the Cape May County area, they offer great equipment both in their Ocean City NJ store and online at good prices. Contact them at (609) 398-2248 or visit the website.

Jersey Shore Fishing Tackle Homepage

Bluefish Fishing Tips

Bluefish are a very popular and abundant fish that can be caught all over the Jersey Shore. Wire leaders are a essential to successfully catching these fish, their razor sharp teeth are capable of cutting even 80lb Fluorocarbon leaders. Anglers use a variety of plugs, sand eel type jigs, squid or mackerel like lures when casting or trolling. Bunker, mackerel or eels are the preferred live baits. When these are not available, many types of cut bait also work.

Tips on Catching Bluefish

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When and where:

In New Jersey, the bluefish show up in the spring around early May, and they stay all summer long and into October. Another good thing about bluefish is that you can often catch them during the day; even in the summer. However, early morning and at dusk are the best times to catch bluefish. They can be caught right off the coast and out in the water. Fishing for them can be easily be done from a boat or on shore. The bluefish bite is at its best at dawn or dusk and any other time when there are low light conditions. The bluefish are much more aggressive than most fish and can often be found blitzing bait even under the midday sun. When they are not blitzing bait, they school up in staging areas and can be easily convinced to bite. Bluefish can be found in any depth and in almost any location where there is bait in the vicinity. They will frequently shadow a school of bait for a period of time and then suddenly make their attack. The resulting commotion will get the attention of every seagull within sight or earshot. A good moving tide can certainly improve the bite, but it is not unusual to see the fish feed right through the slack or flood.

Watch the birds:

The birds are very helpful when bluefish fishing. The birds can either be high flying, bee lining, screaming, wet roosting, or dry roosting. The angler needs to understand the implications of each of these behaviors. High flying birds typically circle repeatedly above a rather large patch of water. This is a sign that baitfish are concentrated beneath the surface of the water and out of their reach. They can easily cover a large area from well above the surface and they are waiting for predators to drive the bait to the top. It is very import for the angler to not have tunnel vision when working an area. Many times the fisherman’s concentration is on a small patch of water that the fish recently occupied, when just over their shoulder a full scale blitz is going on. Watch for birds flying relatively low over the water in a straight line. Several birds all heading in the same direction are probably making a bee line towards some obvious surface activity. When there are lots of birds over relatively wide area, the best thing to do is to listen for their screams. When bait appears on the top, they cannot contain their excitement and immediately give away the location. Large numbers of birds sitting on the water in an area is a sign that some significant feeding activity recently took place. The bait has probably gone deep and may be directly beneath them. The bass and blues may be nearby and simply taking a breather. A big flock on the water bears watching for a least a few minutes. A large number of birds roosting on rocks or docks suggest that there is probably a very large bait source in the area, but nothing has happened for quite some time. This may be worth revisiting later in the tide.

Use light Fishing Equipment:

Light spinning or bait casting tackle will provide the most sport and enjoyment. A good 6’6’’ to 7’ medium weight, fast action is enough to handle nearly anything. Braided and gel spun lines are perfect for this type of fishing. The thin diameter and slippery surfaces allow for long casts even with some of the smallest lures. The lack of stretch transmits every twitch of the rod directly to the lure and the angler can create some very enticing retrieves. Most pros prefer 20lb test as it has enough strength to handle some of the biggest fish and larger plugs, yet a thin enough diameter so that there is adequate line capacity in most suitable reels. A top quality reel with a good drag is a must.

Using Big lures:

Matching the size of the small baits being pursued is very difficult and unnecessary. These fish are attacking out of impulse and are drawn by the noise and commotion. A noisy 5-7 inch surface plug is most effective. Smaller plugs limit casting distance and make much less commotion. The fish are not intimidated by the larger plug size. Even the smallest blues do not hesitate to attack a plug which is only half their size. All plugs should be tied to a 2-3ft length of 30-50lb Fluorocarbon leader attached to the main line a small Mustad Rolling Swivel. The leader will aid the angler when handling the fish at boat side. Never handle the braided line, the thin diameter and unyielding edge can easily cut you. Popping plugs such as surface cruisers and pencils are usually the most productive. However, these lures take a certain degree of skill and practice to achieve a good presentation. Sometimes it is better to work a flat and angling face popper with a perfect presentation, rather than a surface cruiser in a mediocre presentation. The advantage of the cruiser and pencils is that they have a lot of action with very little forward momentum. This means that the plug stays in front of fish for a longer period of time and really gives the fish a chance to hone in on it.

Patience:

Like any fishing, this is one of the most important tips. When bluefish fishing the angler must resist the temptation to strike back at the fish until it is certain that it has the plug. Many times a fish will strike at a plug repeatedly and not get hooked. Simply maintain the same retrieve that got the fish’s interest in the first place, or stop the retrieve just for a moment to make the lure appear like a stunned or wounded baitfish. Start the retrieve again with just a slight twitch and the fish will usually strike again. If there are no takers during the course of a long retrieve, vary the speed to see if the fish are interested in a slightly different presentation. Slow retrieves are usually more effective as the fish have a much better chance to find the plug. Once the fish does have the plug, a short hook set is usually enough to ensure that it will make it to the side of your boat.

For more helpful Jersey Shore fishing tips as well as top of the line fishing bait and tackle, check out Fin-atics. Serving the Cape May County area, they offer quality equipment both in their Ocean City NJ store and online at good prices. Contact them at (609) 398-2248 or visit the website.

Jersey Shore Fishing Equipment Homepage

Summer Flounder Tips

Now that Summer is around the corner, flounder will become pretty predictable to find. They have returned from their offshore winter areas and are now making their homes in the estuary systems up and down the Atlantic coast. In the fall flounder migrate out the inlets to offshore locations. In the spring they migrate back. Now the warmer months have them on places that they can be found on a pretty regular basis. Today, we are going to give some tips on where to look.

Where to Look For Summer Flounder

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Flounder are where you find them, but there are specific types of locations where they will be more likely to be found:

  1. Creek Mouths – One of the best places to look for flounder is at the mouth of an estuary creek. The number of these creeks in any given area of the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) is crazy. It’s good to ease up to a creek mouth on an incoming tide using a trolling motor. Sometimes you can even just pole up to the mouth. Either way it’s best to be as quiet as possible. Flounder will position themselves at the mouth of the creek, most often facing the incoming tide. As baitfish are pushed into the creek by the tide, they have a perfect place to feed. On the last part of the outgoing tide, this same location could hold a fish or two. They simply turn around and face the outgoing current as the tide pushes the baitfish by them.
  2. Oyster Bars – Oysters live in water where the depth allows them to be out of the water at low tide. The ones that stick up out of the water at low tide are the ones that are ideal to fish. They may be along the edge of the ICW or they may be back up in an estuary creek or river. Flounder can be found along the edges of these bars. They don’t eat the oysters, but they do they feed on the baitfish and small crustaceans that live on and around the oysters. Oyster bars are actually sort of a little eco-system all to themselves. You can fish oyster bars on almost any tide. If you know where the edge of the bar is on a high tide, you can work your bait along that edge without hanging on the oysters. On a low tide edge can see the edge and fish it accordingly.
  3. Marsh Edges – Up and down the ICW there are salt marshes on both sides. Some of these marshes extend back for a half mile or more. Many times a creek runs through them, but more often, they are just large areas of marsh grass. Flounder have a habit of moving along the edges of these salt marshes in shallow water. They will flap themselves down under the mud and wait for baitfish to come by. Baitfish along the marshes will run with the tide along the edge of the grass, dipping in and out where a little runoff exists where water from the marsh can run off into the ICW. Flounder wait and ambush them.

Checking out these areas for flounder won’t guarantee you catch some, but can definitely increase your chances if done correctly. For your flounder fishing equipment, Fin-atics offers a wide assortment of fishing rods, fishing reels, fishing line, and anything else you may need both in store and online at affordable prices. Come check out this awesome Jersey Shore bait and tackle shop today!

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Hobie Kayak Fishing Accessories Ideas

NJ Hobie Kayak DealerHobie Kayaks are some the most popular kayaks Fin-Atics.com sells or rents. Hobie actually manufactures several kayaks for fishing, but improvements always can be made for a custom fit. The Hobie fishing kayaks have built-in rod holders and cargo storage, and the kayaks use a pedal-drive system for control. Customization beyond the factory features is not necessary for basic fishing applications but will make the kayak more friendly for your specific fishing purposes. Custom features should serve a specific purpose and must never compromise your safety in the water.

Many Hobie fishing kayaks have rod holders molded in the kayak. The holders are placed behind the seat and are ideal for trolling. The holders will not interfere with the paddling stroke, and the line will be directly behind the kayak. The location of the line also will prevent tangles with the anchor rope. Additional rod holders can be placed in front of the seat. The extra holders are ideal for casting lures and flies. The holders should be placed far enough forward to clear the paddle stroke and far enough back to be within easy reach. The additional holders allow you to carry trolling rods behind the seat and casting rods in front of the seat.

Additional Kayak Ad-On Features

Hobie fishing kayaks are designed to attach an anchor at the rear of the kayak. The anchor is sold separately and is well worth the investment. The anchor will save you energy on windy days and will allow you to stop and work on a group of fish before moving. The anchor on the back works well, but fisherman who plan on using the anchor system regularly should place another anchor on the front of the kayak. This will give a stable platform and prevent the kayak from swinging in the wind.

Outriggers are a great feature for kayak fishing. The outriggers give a stable fishing craft and make standing a possibility. Fishing from a standing position is valuable for sight fishing and fly-fishing. The outriggers will not slow down the Hobie kayaks because the pedal-drive system can be combined with paddling for extra speed when traveling.
Fish Finder

The fish finder is a valuable fishing tool and can be installed on a Hobie fishing kayak. Place the fish finder in the front of the cockpit where it is visible but does not obstruct your fishing space or the pedal drive. The smaller pedal-drive kayaks do not have space in cockpit for a fish finder, but the device can be mounted on the front or side of the kayak.

Choosing the right kayak, along with all the add-on accessories, can be difficult work. Here at Fin-Atics, we have the to help Contact us today, and we’ll be glad to help

Choosing the Right Fishing Kayaks

Kayak fishing is a sport that is a popular form of recreation that all types of people enjoy. A fishing kayak is relatively inexpensive and easy to use. It allows people to reach spots that normal boats cannot to catch some rare fish. Investing in a fishing kayak is a fine idea for people who truly love this sport. Finding the right one can be a bit overwhelming, so here are some tips from experts:

How to Choose the Best Fishing Kayaks

  • Choose the Right Type of Fishing Kayak – There are many different types of fishing kayaks on the market, and first time buyers can have a hard time picking the right one. The best way to start is by learning about the different types of fishing kayaks so they can make the right decision. There are two main types of fishing kayaks: sit-on-top and sit-in kayaks. Buyers can choose from either a sit-on-top kayak, also called SOTs, or sit-in kayaks, also known as SIKs. SOTs have a seat molded right on top of the main kayak structure, instead of the more traditional kayak model where the person is actually sitting inside a hollow tube. SOTs are easier to get in and out of, customizable, and more comfortable since the person can move around and adjust his or her position easily. SOTs do have certain disadvantages. They have a higher center of gravity, which makes them less stable, and these types of kayaks are often slow and heavy. SIKs, on the other hand, feature the more familiar kayak design wherein the person sits in the hollow of the boat. This makes for a more stable ride and these kayaks are lighter and faster than SOTs, not to mention provide additional protection from cold and wet conditions. However, users can become uncomfortable over a long period of time, and getting in and off the kayak is a challenge.
  • Consider Propulsion Systems – Aside from configuration, buyers can also choose from paddle, pedal, and motorized fishing kayaks. One advantage of kayak fishing is the ability to get to fishing spots that most boats cannot access. Kayak fisherman need to power their boats somehow so they can get to and from their desired locations. The most common and inexpensive option is the paddle. Paddle kayaks are relatively cheap and do not rely on batteries or fuel to run. The downside is that paddling can be very tiring, especially for those who want to go far. After paddling, the person may be too tired to even begin fishing. A good option would be amotorized kayak. These kayaks have their own trolling motors so the user does not have to bother with paddles, allowing him or her to concentrate on fishing. These kayaks tend to be more expensive and heavier, not to mention require more setup and preparation to ensure the motor runs perfectly. A good alternative to either type of propulsion system would be the pedal fishing kayak. These kayaks have flippers, which the user powers by pedals located by the feet. These free up the user’s hands while still allowing him or her to go long distances without becoming too tired.
  • Know Where You Will Be Fishing – Where the person plans to fish is another important consideration. There is a huge difference between freshwater lakes and oceans. Open bodies of water tend to have choppy waves and a light kayak may not be appropriate for some conditions. On the other hand, a small kayak allows for more and easier maneuverability in streams, swamps, and small rivers. Another reason why buyers should think about location is that they need to figure out a way to transport and launch the kayak. Not many people have a dock in their backyard and most kayak fishermen must transport their gear from their home to the water. A small kayak can fit on top of an SUV, but users must pull larger kayaks with a trailer. Water access is another problem, as not all places allow people to drive their car to the edge of the water and launch directly. A large kayak is a problem for those who have to park their car in a separate location and carry their gear to the water.
  • Choose Comfortable Seating – Kayak fishing can take hours, so comfort is definitely a big something to take into consideration. A basic fishing kayak most likely has a hole or a plastic seat included, though some do have padded canoe seats. The buyer should have enough space to stretch. Those who want to buy a more comfortable kayak seat separately should buy a kayak with enough space to fit the seat and the person.
  • Check Out the Storage Space – A kayak fisherman requires more storage space than regular kayakers do. They need space for fishing rods and bait, and maybe even a cooler to keep any fish. A fishing kayak should have enough space to haul all these things, plus any other personal items. A kayak tackle bag, for example, is one accessory any fishing enthusiast should have, so there should be enough space inside to hold it and prevent it from falling overboard.

Fin-atics has a great selection of fishing kayaks, other kayaks, and fishing supplies at affordable prices. They serve towns in Cape May County and other Jersey shore areas such as Ocean City, Wildwood, Middle Township, Upper Township, Woodbine, Barnegat, Cape May, and many more. Contact today at 1-866-224-2248 or visit the website.

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